Waterlight: Amazing device that converts sea water into light

Despite the tremendous technological leaps and advances that humans have made in the last century, much of the world’s population unfortunately still has little or no access to basic resources such as running water, electricity, medical supplies and the Internet, among others. many.

According to the United Nations, electricity demand is expected to increase by 70% by 2035. It is also estimated that fossil fuel reserves will be depleted within the next 52 years. This, combined with the fact that some 840 million people do not have access to electricity, requires new energy solutions.

Photo: WaterLight.com.co

Colombian startup E-Dina has developed a wireless light bulb that converts salt water into electricity as a more reliable alternative to solar light bulbs in off-grid communities. The portable device, called WaterLight, needs about half a liter of seawater (as much as a bottle) – or even emergency urine – to emit light for up to 45 days. Operating as a mini power generator, WATERLIGHT can also be used to charge a mobile phone or other small device via a built-in USB port.

WaterLight combines the product-oriented problem-solving ability of the creative Wunderman Thompson Agency in Colombia with the community approach of E-Dina, a start-up renewable energy company. The two came together to find a way to provide easier, cleaner energy to people who do not have it.

Waterlight: Amazing device that converts sea water into light
Photo: WaterLight.com.co

Wireless light converts a natural resource – salt water – into light, thanks to the ionization process of an electrolyte consisting of salt water that converts the magnesium inside into electricity. Not only is it longer lasting, it is also more efficient, as the power supply is immediate (unlike solar lanterns that have to convert energy) and more reliable (it can be used even in bad weather).

Once the salt particles have evaporated, the lamp can be emptied and refilled, while the used water can be reused for washing or cleaning. Assembled from 100% recycled materials, when it reaches the end of its life, Wunderman Thompson claims that the lamp can be completely recycled.

This light was specially designed for use by a Colombian rural community called Wayúu, an indigenous tribe living in the northernmost tip of South America, where Colombia meets Venezuela. The design itself is governed by respect for the Wayúu people and their ancestral connection to the sea. But the idea is to circulate globally, with an emphasis on communities with direct access to the sea.

Waterlight: Amazing device that converts sea water into light
Photo: WaterLight.com.co

“WaterLight is already on sale – but only to large orders for organizations, not yet to individual consumers. “Right now, we want to get the attention of governments, NGOs and private organizations – those who have the financial strength to make this kind of product accessible to the vulnerable populations who need it.” of this innovative product.

Sources:

brightvibes.com/2370/en/waterlight-incredible-device-that-transforms-seawater-into-light

www.designindaba.com/articles/creative-work/waterlight-converts-water-energy-its-innovative-seawater-powered-lamp

Main photo: WaterLight.com.co


Source: Εναλλακτική Δράση by enallaktikidrasi.com.

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