The farthest star in the universe “captured” the Hubble Telescope

Despite the fact that the war in Ukraine has brought ups and downs in space missions, every day astronomers are faced with new discoveries that impress. And while they now rely heavily on NASA’s state-of-the-art James Webb telescope, the Hubble is what “saw” the light of the most distant single star ever observed. The star Earendel, as it is named, is about 12.9 billion light-years from Earth. This distance record was previously held by a star 4 billion light-years away. It was found again by Hubble in 2018.

Astronomer Brian Welts of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore said in a statement:

“We hardly believed it at first, this star was so far away from the previous farthest star.”

Scientists estimate that Earendel has at least 50 times the mass of our Sun and is millions of times brighter. The star will be further studied by the new more powerful James Webb Space Telescope. It has already been put into orbit and will begin its observations this year. As Welts put it, “With Webb we can see even more distant stars than Earendel, breaking its distance record. “Something incredibly exciting.”

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Source: Digital Life! by www.digitallife.gr.

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