Simmering English cardigan crime is more fun than crime

Do you want to listen further?

Get a Digital Plus subscription and listen on right away.

change subscription

With Digital Plus you can listen to articles. You get access immediately.

Everything immediately breathes peace and idyll in the senior village of Cooper’s Chase in the west of England in Richard Osman’s second crime story about the Thursday Murder Club. The club consists of a four-leaf clover pensioner with the woman Elizabeth in front.

She is a former agent for, and just like in the previous book, she is in the company of her friend Joyce and the two friends Ron and Ibrahim.

Osman quickly and elegantly draws his characters up, so that new readers can easily jump on the bandwagon here without having read book number one in the series.

A ghost from the past soon appears. It is Elizabeth’s ex-husband and even MI5 agent Douglas who in connection with an investigation has stolen a large bag of diamonds from the drug gangster Richard Lomax worth a staggering 200 million kroner.

Douglas desperately needs Elizabeth’s help and cunning brain, as the diamond thief has Lomax right on his heels. In parallel, the author puts a series of small stories in the lake. One of them deals with a violent assault on the retired psychologist Ibrahim. Another is about two local officers who are trying to put a small local drug dealer behind bars.

However, Richard Osman constantly focuses on the ball in his crime script and never leaves the main story for a long period of time.

A bag of diamonds

The pot of mysteries, clues and characters is kept boiling in a good way, and the drama is turned up extra, as Douglas apparently dies and via secret letters sticks clues to Elizabeth, so she and the three friends may / may not be able to find the many valuable diamonds.

“The Man Who Died Twice” is the sequel to Richard Osman’s bestselling crime thriller “Thursday Murder Club”. It’s the difficult twos where Osman has screwed up extra for the drama and for the coziness. The latter, however, most often overshadows the plot, which seems to have to surpass book number one in the series in terms of how grandiose and pompous the ‘final finale’ should be at the end of the book. Fold up

Read more
Foto: Penguin Books UK.

However, it will never be completely exciting and never-thrilling. Richard Osman is just legally a real British cozy uncle who tells. In his setting for crime as a genre, it must be bloody and brutal, but readers must certainly also have fun in the meantime.

Towards the end, unfortunately, it feels as if too much bread is being beaten up.

Some of the riddles and mysteries that Elizabeth and the rest of the Thursday Murder Club solve seem too contrived and become too familiar to be unbelievable.

And it’s as if Richard Osman has deliberately screwed up the buttons a lot to make it as magnificent as possible. Maybe because book number two in its plot should definitely be more grandiose and pompous than the previous crime story?

Of course, all the pieces and clues fall into place eventually. Was Douglas murdered or did he stage his own death in order to get away with the gems for himself?

The answer is not to be revealed here, but I just have to state that the house of cards that Osman has built up over the first 400 pages finally seems to fall to the ground with a bang. But cozy and at times mildly funny, yes, that’s it then.

The man who died twice
Author: Richard Osman. Pages: 440. Award: 299.95 kroner Publisher: Gyldendal


Source: www.berlingske.dk by www.berlingske.dk.

*The article has been translated based on the content of www.berlingske.dk by www.berlingske.dk. If there is any problem regarding the content, copyright, please leave a report below the article. We will try to process as quickly as possible to protect the rights of the author. Thank you very much!

*We just want readers to access information more quickly and easily with other multilingual content, instead of information only available in a certain language.

*We always respect the copyright of the content of the author and always include the original link of the source article.If the author disagrees, just leave the report below the article, the article will be edited or deleted at the request of the author. Thanks very much! Best regards!