Samsung aims to be carbon neutral by 2050


The South Korean electronics group Samsung announced that it intends to use more renewable energies, to invest in the development of energy-efficient products, to increase waste water recycling and to use technologies for the separation of CO₂.

Smartphone market leader Samsung wants to significantly reduce its climate-damaging emissions as part of a new environmental strategy and work CO₂-neutrally by 2050 if possible. The South Korean electronics group announced on Thursday that it intends to use more renewable energies, to invest in the development of energy-efficient products, to increase waste water recycling and to use technologies for the separation of carbon dioxide.

The company is responding to the “dangers of climate change” with its comprehensive plan, said Samsung Electronics Vice Chairman Han Jong Hee. “The consequences of inaction are unimaginable.” Samsung is also the market leader in memory chips and televisions.

As part of the strategy, Samsung has committed to a global initiative to source 100 percent of its electricity from renewable energy sources by 2050 at the latest. According to the group, more than 370 influential companies have joined the RE100 (renewable electricity) initiative led by the Climate Group, which was founded in 2004.

Samsung plans to invest more than 7 trillion won (over 5 billion euros) in various environmental initiatives by 2030. This also includes recycling “electronic waste”, process gases – a by-product of semiconductor production – and reducing pollutant emissions and saving water. The number does not include the costs for the greater use of renewable energies, it said.

Greenpeace called Samsung’s plans a “strong signal for the transition to clean energy”. But the target year of 2050 is too late, climate activist Yeon Ho Yang was quoted as saying by Greenpeace in East Asia. This puts Samsung behind other big tech companies like Apple US0378331005, Microsoft US5949181045 and Google US02079K1079. Samsung itself acknowledged that there are problems getting energy from renewable sources in South Korea.


Source: com! professional by www.com-magazin.de.

*The article has been translated based on the content of com! professional by www.com-magazin.de. If there is any problem regarding the content, copyright, please leave a report below the article. We will try to process as quickly as possible to protect the rights of the author. Thank you very much!

*We just want readers to access information more quickly and easily with other multilingual content, instead of information only available in a certain language.

*We always respect the copyright of the content of the author and always include the original link of the source article.If the author disagrees, just leave the report below the article, the article will be edited or deleted at the request of the author. Thanks very much! Best regards!