Health. Substances that are toxic to babies’ brains in car seats?


The brain development of “an entire generation” could be impacted by toxic substances present in some child car seats, alert researchers from North Carolina in a new study, relayed by the Daily Mail. These scientists warn, in the journal Environmental Health Perspective, on the dangers of “organophosphate esters”, used by manufacturers to make consumer products less flammable, but which are nerve agents.

An impact on the IQ of the youngest

According to the study, which itself brings together dozens of international studies, these toxic substances could have repercussions on the development of children’s cognitive and social skills. They even establish a link between exposure to organophosphate esters and lower IQ, attention span or memory in younger children.

Its products are also said to be present “in a wide variety of electronic objects, construction materials, vehicles, furniture, plastics and textiles”. They are considered safe by regulators, but these products could be “just as harmful” as halogenated flame retardants, already banned for their toxicity.

Pesticides present in our body

Scientists therefore invite manufacturers to change their habits by using materials that are less harmful to health. Babies are particularly affected because their developing brains remain very fragile, but this type of pesticide could have a negative impact on the entire population. According to the researchers, they are potentially present in the environment and even in everyone’s body.

“Organophosphate esters and their metabolites are regularly found in the urine, blood, placental tissue and breast milk of humans around the world,” they explain. Linda Birnbaum, co-author of the study, adds in the British daily that if their commercial use does not cease, “the consequences could be irreversible”.


Source: Le Progrès : info et actu nationale et régionale – Rhône, Loire, Ain, Haute-Loire et Jura | Le Progrès by www.leprogres.fr.

*The article has been translated based on the content of Le Progrès : info et actu nationale et régionale – Rhône, Loire, Ain, Haute-Loire et Jura | Le Progrès by www.leprogres.fr. If there is any problem regarding the content, copyright, please leave a report below the article. We will try to process as quickly as possible to protect the rights of the author. Thank you very much!

*We just want readers to access information more quickly and easily with other multilingual content, instead of information only available in a certain language.

*We always respect the copyright of the content of the author and always include the original link of the source article.If the author disagrees, just leave the report below the article, the article will be edited or deleted at the request of the author. Thanks very much! Best regards!