Aroma of wood kitchen coffee | Daily Metro

A cozy and peaceful atmosphere with rubber trees and stream streams adorns the surroundings of a relatively old house in Kampung Belantik Dalam here.

In one corner of the house, it was seen an elderly man sitting while frying coffee beans using a wood stove, thus creating a fresh aroma that could be consumed throughout the area.

Mohd Sabiah Kadir, 69, is a traditional coffee businessman who has been doing business with his wife, Kaedah Ahmad, 65, for nearly 40 years.

“Purified coffee beans need to be fried until cooked and then blackened before grinding and turning into coffee powder.

COST of coffee crushed using a non-stick dimple is inserted into the grinder for crushing to powder before packing.

“The specialty of my coffee is because it uses traditional methods such as frying it with wood stove and smashing coffee beans with hindsight,” he said.

Mohd Sabiah, better known by Pak Mat’s call among the villagers, said that despite the traditional methods, all processes had to be carefully followed to safeguard the quality and taste of coffee.

According to him, only two types of coffee beans were used to produce coffee powder, namely Robusta and Liberica, both imported from Indonesia.

“In addition, we do not mix many other ingredients when cooking coffee beans, we use only natural coffee beans and sugar, which makes the coffee taste more natural,” he said.

COST of coffee crushed using a non-stick dimple is inserted into the grinder for crushing to powder before packing.

Further, Mohd Sabiah said since its small scale operation in 1981, the coffee powder was in excellent demand and now almost 200 pounds of coffee is produced every month to meet the demand.

“For the villagers here (they) better know my coffee as Pak Mat’s coffee, while customers from outside (they) call it coffee.

“Thankfully, our product is a lot of villagers who help out to friends or family abroad or other districts, and there are also government and private agencies who come and buy and help promote my coffee,” he said.

The KOPI is ready to be wrapped in the village of Belantik Dalam.
The KOPI is ready to be wrapped in the village of Belantik Dalam.

Despite the increasing demand, Mohd Sabiah said he and his wife could not meet everything due to age factors.

“My wife and I were not able to meet the demands of our customers in large quantities, just five pounds a day or two in an estimated 30 packs of coffee.

“We are not hiring because no young people are interested in this job, and our children when they can work are no longer interested in continuing this business,” Mohd Sabiah said.

MOHD Sodium powdered coffee beans using a non-stick dimmer.
MOHD Sodium powdered coffee beans using a non-stick dimmer.