Arm and Qualcomm kicked the dust

Arm, majority owned by Japan’s SoftBank, sued Qualcomm and its subsidiary, Nuvia, for patent infringement and other breach of contract terms. The British company designing processor architectures and the world’s largest mobile processor manufacturer were once considered to be each other’s closest allies, and the lawsuit may be another sign that the relationship between the two is not as rosy as it was years ago.

Arm’s submission is related to Nuvia’s $1.4 billion acquisition transaction last year, in connection with which the processor architecture design company objected that certain Nuvia processor designs linked to Arm licenses could only have been transferred to Qualcomm with the company’s consent, but the American manufacturer he did not ask for such permission.

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Dark clouds had already begun to gather over the relationship between Qualcomm and Arm. The two companies established a partnership when Qualcomm stopped developing its own architecture, and since then practically all of the company’s system processors – mostly chips intended for mobile phones and other smart devices – use some Arm design.

According to insider information, however, recently Qualcomm has been less and less satisfied with Arm’s slowing development pace, which led to Apple’s own solutions thoroughly beating the current Qualcomm flagships in terms of some of their performance indicators.

The American manufacturer bought Nuvia last year in part to offset this, which was founded by some people separated from Apple, who had previously worked on the Cupertino company’s own processor, the M1, which ended the Intel era and was intended for Macs.

The M1 has finally brought significant success to the Mac product line for many years, and Qualcomm has declared that it wanted and wants to repeat this success with the help of Nuvia in the segment of Windows PCs and servers.

Although the use of cores designed by Nuvia would still generate income for Arm, the company would presumably be able to collect a much smaller amount than if Qualcomm were to build its solutions exclusively on British designs.


Source: HWSW Informatikai Hírmagazin by www.hwsw.hu.

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