About songs, time and trees: Nothing is scary for us

Turbo Trans Tourists they released the song “Nothing is Scary”, an exceptional and authentic expression of modern neurosis. Him, let’s go back to the beginning, far, to the beginning.

Keith Richards once wrote that rock and roll would cease to exist when no one remembered World War II. Listen to songs by Chuck Berry, Little Richard or the early Elvis – these are lascivious ode to the freedom of love as opposed to the conservative strict morals of the older generation. Later, expanding the field of expression of subversion, the songs successfully spoke about broader social topics as well.

Then, softer directions of music, such as hits and evergreens, embraced the sentimental repertoire of rock music, so songs about various love relationships were no longer a brave or exclusive thing. As early as the 1970s, rock became mostly ambitious, oversized and intellectual. He grew up too early.

And then the punk generation came up with and felt that rock and roll was ideal to express neuroses! It was a real revolution. The cabaret-cynical voice of John Lawton in the T-shirt he writes on Destroy is a true expression of the frustration of an intelligent man living in a repressive society. A good example is the group The Clash who was asked why she writes social and rebellious songs, and there are no love songs, she answered, I paraphrase, that the topic of love songs is already well covered.

The domestic scene also understood this quite well. If we listen to the record or watch the videos of the bands from the compilation Package deal, we see that all the songs, except to some extent She wakes up, are hymns to neuroses. Rock and roll, before any other genre, can express frustration, helplessness, fear, rejection. It can, even desirable, be weird and silly. To pretend to be crazy!

The author of this text gained experience and peace of mind by participating in numerous manifestations of energy that rode or tamed neurosis (listen to the song Ecology, peace group Masts or Is the Moon firm enough? Autumn Orchestra).

Basically, in the twenty-first century, that jerk, that nerve, that refusal to participate in formal nonsense, that everything is done contrary to the prescribed, it is possible that it is the last carbon imprint of rock and roll, but also its last strength.

Here we come to the Tourist. Jimmy i Bosko they understood that the usual practice of music was becoming futile and were ready to take a radical step. Break down the form, change. Tourists were demolished to create Turbo Trans Tourists, and the aforementioned Mijušković brothers became sweaty long-haired white men who express just – a magnificent neurosis!

At a time when everything is terrible, they frantically sing yes Nothing terrible. The music disintegrates and composes, the words splash over the broken matrix. The result is that, being exposed to this song, we finally feel that we are not deceived, that we are not just consumers, but also interlocutors, and that we are not being subjected to marketing violence. Besides, it’s silly, it screams and it’s funny and it bursts. It tramples the dullness of form and control.

How do we live? How are we? And, nothing is scary it is us.

Illustration:

By song Nothing terrible Turbo Trans Tourists testify to the mental state of today.


Source: Balkanrock.com by balkanrock.com.

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